Rygar (NES)

Always leave ‘em smiling!

Ah, good old Rygar! I actually owned this one growing up, so it feels great to finally give it another look. Like catching up with an old friend. Originally released as Arugosu no Senshi: Hachamecha Daishingeki (“Warrior of Argus: Extreme Great Charge”) in 1987, the game we know in the West as Rygar is a radical reworking by Tecmo of their own 1986 arcade title.

The arcade Rygar was a straightforward “run from left to right” action-platformer and a great one by the standards of the time. This was mainly due to the lead character’s unusual weapon: Some sort of serrated shield on a chain called the diskarmor that lashed out to smite enemies before returning to Rygar yo-yo style. It didn’t make much sense, but it was just so cool. To this day, I’ll always drop a few quarters into a Rygar machine given the chance.

The Rygar I’m looking at today is a whole other story. The main character and his cool weapon are still present, except now it’s in the context of an exploration-based action adventure seemingly inspired by Metroid that also includes some light RPG elements.

Rygar takes place in the fantasy realm of Argool, described as “prosperous” and “holy” in the instruction manual. One day, a monster king named Ligar attacks Argool with his minions (the manual calls them “animalized men wriggling eerily,” which is just amazing) and swiftly subjugates everyone, including the “five legendary Indora Gods.” Yeesh. Some gods they turned out to be. In desperation, the people pray for the savior that prophecy states will appear “when the peaceful land is covered with EVIL SPIRITS.” Their prayers are answered when the great warrior Rygar of Argus rises from the dead and sets out to save the day.

In this case, saving the day means wandering Argool searching out the five sacred treasures needed to access Ligar’s flying castle, each of which is guarded by a different boss monster. This is mostly done in a side-scrolling style reminiscent of the arcade original, though there are also three areas of the game that employ an overhead view of the action where Rygar can move and attack in four directions as well as jump in eight.

Regardless of the perspective, you can expect to be under attack from various monsters the majority of the time. At first, your inclination might be to avoid as many baddies as possible, but fighting everything you can really is the way to go. Killing monsters earns you experience points that go toward improving two important statistics: Tone and last. I can only assume that these odd names are the result of awkward translation, as “attack” and “defense” would have been much better choices. Higher tone means enemies die in fewer hits and increasing last earns you a longer health bar.

The pause screen also displays a third value: Mind. This is the equivalent of magic points and is boosted by collecting star icons dropped by defeated foes. Mind points can then be spent as needed on three different spells that either improve Rygar’s offensive abilities temporarily (Power Up, Attack & Assail) or restore lost health (Recover).

Similar to other open world action games of the time, much of Rygar consists of locating doors to new areas and then exploring those areas as thoroughly as possible. Whenever an obstacle is encountered that halts your progress, you’ll need to backtrack after making a note of it (mental or otherwise) so that you can return once you’ve acquired the inventory item needed to proceed. These progression items include a grappling hook, a pulley, and a crossbow.

Borrowing a page from The Legend of Zelda, hints are provided by old hermits found tucked away in remote locations. Unlike in Zelda, these old beardy dudes are shirtless and super buff. Their dialog ranges from fairly useful to completely pointless (“Fight! Fight! Fight!”), but at least it generally makes sense, giving Rygar a leg up over some of its less coherent peers. It’s the visuals here that always stuck with me, though. These cavernous chambers with their lime green brick walls, unexplained angular shadows, and giant, half-naked old men squatting atop narrow pillars that tower over Rygar’s tiny sprite have to be one of the more surreal sights the NES library has to offer, and that’s saying a lot.

While I’m on the subject, the artwork in Rygar is generally good for a 1987 game, if a little inconsistent. The character sprites are the clear highlight. They’re very detailed and the designs of the numerous grotesque monsters do not disappoint. The big exception is poor Rygar himself, who would have really benefitted from some actual facial features. Backgrounds include some nice details, particularly on the stonework, but several areas suffer from drab coloration, including one stage that seems to utilize gray and black exclusively. I’m playing this on an NES, Tecmo, not a Tiger LCD handheld. The soundtrack by Michiharu Hasuya similarly has its ups and down. I found some of the tunes a bit on the droning side and others, like the stirring cave theme, to be real gems.

Rygar is not a long game, nor is it a difficult one once a fair amount of experience points have been gathered. Players with an understanding of the stage layouts can easily reach the end in an hour or two, depending on whether they want to take the time to level Rygar up to maximum power along the way or not. New players learning the game as they go, on the other hand, will require considerably more time and may consequently experience some frustration due to the game’s lack of a battery save or password feature. This is one of those games like Blaster Master that was responsible for a lot of parental nagging back in the day over consoles being left on overnight.

Putting my own personal nostalgia aside as much as possible, I still find Rygar to be an excellent example of an early non-linear platformer on the NES. This is primarily due to two factors: How well the Rygar character himself controls and how the designers smartly avoided shoehorning in tedious gimmicks. Rygar’s movements are smooth and precise. His jump is a bit on the floaty side, but his ability to bounce on top of enemies to stun them and gain some extra height in the process is pretty neat. The diskarmor is also as awesome as ever here, with satisfying sound effects and real sense of weight behind it due to the way most enemies are pushed backward on contact. The difference in handling between the agile Rygar and the stiff, awkward hero of Clash at Demonhead really makes the latter game seem amateurish. Best of all, you won’t find anything blatantly extraneous here like the wretched first-person segments from The Goonies II or Castlevania II’s currency grinding. Rygar wisely keeps the focus exclusively on the platforming, combat, and exploration, making it a stronger game overall than any of these three. I suppose if you’re going to take inspiration from Metroid, it pays to do it right.

As far as problems go, I already touched on the lack of a save function and the way the challenge suffers once Rygar himself levels up enough to become an unstoppable force that his enemies just can’t compete with. Another missed opportunity is the rather weak boss encounters. Only one of them even moves around to any significant degree. The rest, including final boss Ligar, either stand in one place lobbing shots at you or shuffle around the arena so slowly that they may as well just stay put, too. Levels are much more about the journey than the destination thanks to these disappointing fights. I don’t think these flaws come close to dooming the game. Just be prepared for a slightly odd downward difficulty curve as things get easier the further you progress.

Sadly, the Rygar series never really went anywhere from here, unless you count the barely remembered attempt at a reboot on the PlayStation 2 in 2002. At the very least, the reimagined Rygar’s success on the NES served as an auspicious precident for Tecmo and they would go on to pursue a similarly comprehensive redesign of their mediocre arcade beat-’em-up Ninja Gaiden, transforming it into an all-time classic action-platformer in the process.

Quibbles aside, I recommend Rygar highly to anyone with an interest in early console action-adventure games and/or wriggling eerily.

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